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PROSITE documentation PDOC51301

KilA-N domain profile





Description

The amino-terminal module of the poxvirus D6R/NIR proteins defines a novel conserved DNA-binding domain (the KilA-N domain) that is found in a wide range of proteins of large bacterial and eukaryotic DNA viruses [1]. Putative proteins with homology to the KilA-N domain have also been identified in Maverick transposable elements of the parabasalid protozoa Trichomonas vaginalis [2]. The KilA-N domain has been suggested to be homologous to the fungal DNA-binding APSES domain (see <PDOC51299>). In all proteins shown to contain the KilA-N domain, it occurs at the extreme amino terminus accompanied by a wide range of distinct carboxy-terminal domains. These carboxy-terminal modules may be enzymes, such as the nuclease domains, or might mediate additional, specific interactions with nucleic acids or proteins, like the RING (see <PDOC00449>) or CCCH fingers in the poxviruses [1].

The KilA-N domain is predicted to adopt an α+β fold with four conserved strands and at least two conserved helices [1].

Some proteins known to contain a KilA-N domain are listed below:

  • Bacteriophage P1 protein kilA.
  • Fowlpox virus (FPV) protein FPV236.
  • Fowlpox virus (FPV) hypothetical protein FPV248.
  • Vaccinia virus hypothetical 21.7 kDa HindIII-C protein.

The profile we developed covers the entire KilA-N domain.

Last update:

March 2007 / First entry.

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Technical section

PROSITE method (with tools and information) covered by this documentation:

KILA_N, PS51301; KilA-N domain profile  (MATRIX)


References

1AuthorsIyer L.M. Koonin E.V. Aravind L.
TitleExtensive domain shuffling in transcription regulators of DNA viruses and implications for the origin of fungal APSES transcription factors.
SourceGenome Biol. 3:RESEARCH0012-RESEARCH0012(2002).
PubMed ID11897024

2AuthorsPritham E.J. Putliwala T. Feschotte C.
TitleMavericks, a novel class of giant transposable elements widespread in eukaryotes and related to DNA viruses.
SourceGene 390:3-17(2007).
PubMed ID17034960
DOI10.1016/j.gene.2006.08.008



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